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Newly transplanted passion fruit vine waning

 
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sbear



Joined: 31 Oct 2011
Posts: 20
Location: Tempe

PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2011 10:55 am    Post subject: Newly transplanted passion fruit vine waning Reply with quote

I bought a passion fruit vine from Home Depot 3 weeks ago and transplanted it into a location near the wall facing north. The vine has been waning since being transplanted. I water it by hose twice a week about 5 mins each time. The location does not get direct sun light.

Could anyone provide me some advice to revive the passion fruit vine?

Thanks in advance!



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Newly transplanted passion fruit vine waning



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Newly transplanted passion fruit vine waning


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phoenixtropicals
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Joined: 06 May 2008
Posts: 1178
Location: Mesa Arizona

PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2011 12:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually, it looks pretty good, but just a little wilted. Most of the times these plants are grown in greenhouses, so when you take them and put them out in our dry air they take a while to adjust.

I think you can back off on your watering to once a week, as long as you are soaking it good, since it is getting much cooler out, and also since your vine is planted on the North side of the wall. Don't fertilize until things warm up significantly in the spring, like mid March. Make sure you cover your plant if we have any serious freeze warnings.

See the site for instructions on protecting from frost http://www.phoenixtropicals.com/frostDamage.html.

You will see your leaves become a lighter green over time. This is due to our soil here and not a big deal. You won't see a whole lot of new growth until spring.

Let us know how it goes.
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sbear



Joined: 31 Oct 2011
Posts: 20
Location: Tempe

PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2011 6:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi phoenixtropicals, thanks for your advice!!

Do you think I need to re-transplant the vine to the south side of the wall to get direct sun light? Some people suggested to do that so the vine would survive. What is your take?

Thanks again!!
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phoenixtropicals
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Joined: 06 May 2008
Posts: 1178
Location: Mesa Arizona

PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2011 8:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The south side is too hot. It will cook during the summer. Mine is on the east side, afternoon shade, and it is almost too hot for it in summer. The north side might be a perfect spot, because it will get morning sun in the late spring, early summer.

I think leave it where you have it for now. If you don't get flowers or very few flowers before June then you might want to move it to the east side of a wall. Don't transplant during summer though. Do it in spring. Yah, that would mean you would have to wait a year to transplant. Keep in mind that south and west face walls will be way too hot for it.

Since those plants are only $20 at Home Depot maybe you should just get another and put it east facing. You can double your odds that way. Very Happy
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sbear



Joined: 31 Oct 2011
Posts: 20
Location: Tempe

PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2011 11:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks phoenixtropicals.

One thing I forgot to mention - when I transplanted the vine from the bucket to the current location, I might have damaged the root ball when I pulled the vine and the stick for the vine out from the bucket. Will this be the root cause for the plant wilting?

If so, how could I revive/save the vine?

Thanks again!
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phoenixtropicals
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Joined: 06 May 2008
Posts: 1178
Location: Mesa Arizona

PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2011 6:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I doubt the disturbance of the roots during planting caused it. Not more than the usual transplant shock anyways. I think just be patient and water it correctly and it will turn around. Ignore all the advice you might get on super plant vitamins etc. Putting a bunch of chemicals in the soil will just cause you plant more stress. Putting a layer (1 inch) of compost around the base might be a good idea though.
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sbear



Joined: 31 Oct 2011
Posts: 20
Location: Tempe

PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2011 9:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you think Vitamin B-1 will help roots' growth? Thanks!!
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phoenixtropicals
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Joined: 06 May 2008
Posts: 1178
Location: Mesa Arizona

PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2011 5:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Beware of Gardening Myths

By Robert Cox, Horticulture Agent, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension

Many consumers assume that products on the store shelf must have been tested to prove their claims. Certainly, fertilizers have to meet nutrient content requirements, and pesticides are rigorously tested for safety before EPA registration.

For some other garden products, however, no such testing is required before sale to the public.

A good example is vitamin B1 (thiamine), often sold to "prevent transplant shock" and "stimulate new root growth" when planting trees, shrubs, roses and other plants. A study in the 1930's provided the basis for such claims. Pea roots cut off from the plant were placed in a culture medium in the laboratory.

The researchers knew that thiamine was normally found in roots, so they put thiamine in the culture medium and found that root growth did occur. Vitamin B1 is manufactured in 0lant leaves and sent to the roots, but if roots are cut off and placed in a petri plate, vitamin B1 stimulates growth of the roots when it saturates the culture medium.

Planting trees in a soil environment, however, is vastly different from a laboratory culture. Most important, gardeners aren't in the habit of cutting off the root system when planting. Several studies using intact mums, apple trees, orange trees, pine, tomato, beans, pepper, corn, pear, watermelon and squash have failed to demonstrate that vitamin B1 treatments provide any type of growth response.

Some "root stimulator" products contain a rooting hormone and fertilizer along with vitamin B1. These materials may increase rooting and growth, not the vitamin B1.

The bottom line: While root stimulator products are not necessary for transplant success, if you do use one, make sure it contains a rooting hormone and fertilizer rather than just vitamin B1. The vitamin B1 is for marketing purposes rather than actual effect.

http://www.coopext.colostate.edu/4DMG/Garden/beware.htm
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