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Dang it - bought a Jacaranda without doing much research.

 
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psimitry



Joined: 22 Sep 2009
Posts: 75
Location: maricopa

PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2010 5:58 pm    Post subject: Dang it - bought a Jacaranda without doing much research. Reply with quote

So as the subject says, I'm now the proud owner of a jacaranda that I didn't do any research before I bought it. I happened to be at my parents' place and they have a HUGE one that I thought looked amazing, so I thought I'd pick one up.

So of course, I look it up online and find out that one shouldn't plant this tree any closer than 15 feet from the house. Dammit. My plan was to put it outside the front door about 9 feet off the house. So that's no good. Dang it - that would have looked really good there too.

The only other location I have for it is in the center of my backyard along the back fence. The problem is that right along the other side of the fence are trees that the city put in. Can I plant it there without dealing with too much competition? Help would be GREATLY appreciated.
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phoenixtropicals
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Joined: 06 May 2008
Posts: 1178
Location: Mesa Arizona

PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2010 10:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

9 feet from the house actually isn't that close. I have lots of neighbors that have them that close. Also, I haven't ever seen a gigantic jacaranda here in AZ anyways. Maybe in California they get big enough to start damaging the foundation of your house, but here... maybe not. It would probably take a really long time to happen, and with some pruning you could probably make it never happen.
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psimitry



Joined: 22 Sep 2009
Posts: 75
Location: maricopa

PostPosted: Tue Aug 24, 2010 11:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fair enough, so constantly prune it. That's doable until it gets too tall anyway. The only thing I'm curious about then, don't the roots spread regardless of whether or not the tree is growing?

I actually thought (though I'm sure this would be a waste of money) about buying some long sheets of plexiglass and inserting them down into the ground to form a barrier between the tree and the foundation.

Not sure how I would actually get it done though, and like I said, I'm sure it'd be a waste of time and money.
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psimitry



Joined: 22 Sep 2009
Posts: 75
Location: maricopa

PostPosted: Thu Aug 26, 2010 11:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So what WOULD happen if I planted it next to the fence where the city trees are right on the other side? The Jacaranda would never have sun problems since it's on the south side of the fence, so I'm curious if it would thrive there with the competition.
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phoenixtropicals
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Joined: 06 May 2008
Posts: 1178
Location: Mesa Arizona

PostPosted: Thu Aug 26, 2010 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Its hard to say. It depends on how big the other trees are. If they are very close and large enough to put your jacaranda in the shade all the time it probably won't grow very nicely.
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psimitry



Joined: 22 Sep 2009
Posts: 75
Location: maricopa

PostPosted: Thu Aug 26, 2010 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well the spot in my backyard is south of the trees on the other side of the fence. Therefore, since the sun is always in the south, it's not really possible for them to shade the spot unless they got huge and were able to overhang the wall. They don't (and even if I did, I could call the city and tell them to cut it back).

So really, root competition is the only thing worth worrying about on there as far as I know.
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phoenixtropicals
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Joined: 06 May 2008
Posts: 1178
Location: Mesa Arizona

PostPosted: Sat Aug 28, 2010 11:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It sounds like its worth a try. If there are roots from the other trees when you dig your hole try to chop them back a ways to give your new tree a chance to get started.
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GermanStar



Joined: 17 Jun 2010
Posts: 117
Location: Fountain Hills, AZ

PostPosted: Mon Aug 30, 2010 8:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My Jacaranda is about 3' from my house. It was there when I bought the house. And as phoenixtropicals suggested, most Jacarandas stay fairly compact in the Valley. They grow in direct proportion to the amount of water you provide.
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aliciarohail



Joined: 15 Jan 2014
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 12:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So I currently have about six different hibiscus plants in my back yard. Overall, they grow very well, but while they grow like crazy, they don't flower all that much and when they DO flower, some of the buds look... iffy.
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phoenixtropicals
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Joined: 06 May 2008
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Location: Mesa Arizona

PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 7:58 am    Post subject: Hibiscus not blooming Reply with quote

The flowering is seasonal, so in the winter you might not get many blooms. Fertilizers are rated for there NPK ratios. N-nitrogen P-Phosphorus K-Potassium. Try using a fertilizer high in PK and low in N.

Also, some hibiscus seem to bloom much more in this climate than others. I have found that Brilliant also known as San Diego Red with the really big red blossoms is a star performer here. I have another hibiscus with a purple center and orange petals, called Canary which hardly ever blooms.
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