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Tree identification


 
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Gorm



Joined: 24 Jul 2014
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2014 1:20 am    Post subject: Tree identification Reply with quote

Hi there,

I am not sure if it is okay to post this here in your forum but this is the only forum I have come by with activity. Smile

I am trying to identify this tree - locally it is known as Asian apple or chinese apple but my google search so far has come up with nothing.
I saw the tree i South Africa and it bears fruit in the winter.

The file attachments are photos of the tree and fruit.

Thank you so much for your time!

Amanda



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phoenixtropicals
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Joined: 06 May 2008
Posts: 1207
Location: Mesa Arizona

PostPosted: Sun Jul 27, 2014 5:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just looking at the photo, my first impression is that it is something in the apple/loquat family. The leaves look nothing like a loquat though, and neither does the scaly bark.

I looked around the web and I think maybe it is marula (Sclerocarya birrea), which is #9 in this list.

http://listverse.com/2011/07/08/top-20-fruits-you-probably-dont-know/

Google the name and you'll get more photos. Your fruit do look more fuzzy and pointed than the marula photos on the web, although the bark on the tree is a perfect match.
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Gorm



Joined: 24 Jul 2014
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sun Jul 27, 2014 8:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you so much for your help - it does look a lot like a Marula
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phoenixtropicals
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Joined: 06 May 2008
Posts: 1207
Location: Mesa Arizona

PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2015 7:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So, due to this post I was inspired to buy some Marula seeds on ebay from South Africa. I had them growing in pots outside and they were doing very well. However, the first frost we had here which was an above freezing frost, probably like 35°F, totally killed the leaves. So, it appears these things are very frost sensitive. I'll have to see if the stem has some life left in it. My mangoes and guavas endured the same weather with barely a mark.
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darkcoolboo



Joined: 17 Nov 2014
Posts: 129

PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2015 10:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Speaking of African fruits, I've found that monkey orange (Strychnos spinosa/Strychnos cocculoides) and Imbe (Garcinia livingstonei) to be interesting. I've never grow them, but I would imagine they would do fine because of their drought tolerance. I'm not sure of cold tolerance though. Monkey orange and Imbe are both acidic fruits. Imbe as also part of the mangosteen familyand is a small tree. If you don't know about it:
http://blogs.worldwatch.org/nourishingtheplanet/imbe-africa%E2%80%99s-queen-of-fruits/
http://blogs.worldwatch.org/nourishingtheplanet/monkey-oranges-mouthwatering-potential/
http://blogs.worldwatch.org/nourishingtheplanet/marula-food-function-and-sustainable-development/

Another interesting African/Indian tree is known as Moringa. Dubbed as a 'superfood', many grow it in AZ. Here is only of my seedlings.



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Moringa seedling too early, but ready for flowering. Sown in June 2014.
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Moringa seedling too early, but ready for flowering. Sown in June 2014.


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phoenixtropicals
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Joined: 06 May 2008
Posts: 1207
Location: Mesa Arizona

PostPosted: Fri Jan 16, 2015 9:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the info. Very interesting. The Imbe looks very similar to one I am growing that is in the same family called Garcinia Intermedia or Lemon drop mangosteen. I am surprised that it survived the light frost whereas the Marula did not seem to. It seems to be very slow growing though. I am growing 3 of them in pots.

The monkey orange also looks very interesting. If it is really subtropical as they say then it could survive the cooler weather here.

Yes, moringa is grown by lots of people successfully. It grows like a weed I hear.
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darkcoolboo



Joined: 17 Nov 2014
Posts: 129

PostPosted: Thu Jan 29, 2015 6:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I hear lemon drop is one of them supertropicals, so i find that strange.
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